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Author Topic: What happened to the fires?  (Read 113 times)

Paikea

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What happened to the fires?
« on: May 08, 2019, 08:25:38 am »
Just wondering what was the outcome of the fires that you had recently?

Has it been as bad as everyone thought or was there some respite and untouched pockets that are still pristine?

Reddory's vivid description of the potential impact (bare banks, blackened trees etc) was devastating and conjured up a vision of a nature lovers hell.

 As someone once sang, you don't know what you got until you lose itdoh1 doh1 doh1

Cheers

Paikea
PAIKEA

reddory

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What happened to the fires?
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2019, 02:01:43 pm »
Well, despite the broad extent of fire areas in the south and the central plateau, there is still a surprising amount that escaped.  In places, some almost irreplaceable vegetation and its ecology have been destroyed, but thankfully not as much as people feared.  The bits I was most concerned about - the upper middle Huon river and the lower Weld river - certainly have been fried to a crisp.  I haven't been able to bring myself to walk in to the reaches where I took those earlier photos, but this is the area of Weld at the Eddy Rd bridge:

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The bridge is closed as all the timber supports and buttresses have gone.  The walk down to the river from Eddy Rd now looks like this:

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This all used to be ancient, thick native wet sclerophyll and rainforest vegetation.

Similar damage extends also up some 30 or more kilometres of the Huon river (both banks and for kms each side) including the Arve river and Picton river.

However, lower down, the Little Denison and the Russell totally escaped - greener, farmland and managed forest mostly.

Up on the plateau, areas around Little Pine and Penstock Lagoons, and the northern shores of Lake Echo, all got fried, as did vast tracts of moorland and marshes all the way to Great Lake and almost to Lake Augusta: according to the Tas Fire Service website, they are even now still working to extinguish persistent hot spots in that area!

So as I said, some bad news, but thankfully we got off quite lightly in the end.

 

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