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Author Topic: fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress  (Read 603 times)

reddory

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fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress
« on: June 27, 2018, 06:35:52 pm »
Hi all

Went off this morning for another shot at winter gummies out from Dover.  Beautiful conditions: calm, rising tide, and Solunar tables (via the "Tides 4 Fishing" website) said a good day for fishing.

Headed out and turned south looking for flat bottom on the fishfinder/sounder.  Had to cover a lot of ground before I finally found a bit that might do the biz.  Dropped anchor, put the berley pot over the side, baited a couple of rigs and let them down.  Twiddled the thumbs for a bit, then a bite.  Big wrasse. Returned unharmed.  Twiddled thumbs for a bit more... another big wrasse.  Returned unharmed.  Concluded I was still not on clean bottom - especially as the anchor was picking and jerking its way across the bottom.  Weed, rock - not gummy territory.

Headed back into the bay, set up a slow troll around Hope Island and collected one decent-sized 'couta (returned) and three short-fin pike (also returned, although I know they are quite good eating in winter, when the flesh is firm: should have kept them, in retrospect).

Back into the head of the bay looking for an Aus salmon or two.  Found three, in fact, and kept them.  Then a complete surprise - spun up a nice tailor:

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Bit unusual, I thought: I know there were a few around over the summer, but this is mid-winter: water temp barely 10C.  I have reported it to Redmap.

Then knowing the solunar said there would be a hot bite for about an hour or two around midday, I sought out a flathead patch and dropped a couple of SPs  Not much happening at 11 am, but by 11.15 it had GONE OFF.  I was like a windmill, landing fish after fish after fish non-stop.  Couldn't get more than one bite at a time of my sandwich!  Fished until my arms were dropping off: released about 30 undersize, kept a dozen real good ones.  Then about 1pm it all started to go quiet again.  Was just setting out to start a drift one last time, when I heard a whistle and a plaintive cry from a boat 150 metres away:  "I can't start my motor!"

I ambled over and found a mature lady angler in consternation: Savage 4.8 metre "Osprey" with Mercury self-oiling motor and an aux - and unable to get a pop out of either.  Tried the key start: silence.  "Aha" I thought, "I've been here before".  The electronic gizmo that prevents you starting the motor when it's in gear was misbehaving.  I shoved her control into forward and back to neutral a couple of times but that didn't free it.  So, back into reverse then to neutral: turn the key - brmmm!  She decided she should head back to the ramp while the thing was operating.  Nearly kissed me in thanks, but thankfully settled for a high five and was off.

I ran one more drift after that, but the fish had gone to sleep again, so finished my coffee and called it a day.  Six different species caught, some decent fish for a feed or two (in fact, five) - and a good deed done.  All in all, a most eventful morning! (And gorgeous sunshine to boot!)

 

Rohan

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fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress
« Reply #1 on: June 27, 2018, 08:03:08 pm »
Hi all

Went off this morning for another shot at winter gummies out from Dover.  Beautiful conditions: calm, rising tide, and Solunar tables (via the "Tides 4 Fishing" website) said a good day for fishing.

Headed out and turned south looking for flat bottom on the fishfinder/sounder.  Had to cover a lot of ground before I finally found a bit that might do the biz.  Dropped anchor, put the berley pot over the side, baited a couple of rigs and let them down.  Twiddled the thumbs for a bit, then a bite.  Big wrasse. Returned unharmed.  Twiddled thumbs for a bit more... another big wrasse.  Returned unharmed.  Concluded I was still not on clean bottom - especially as the anchor was picking and jerking its way across the bottom.  Weed, rock - not gummy territory.

Headed back into the bay, set up a slow troll around Hope Island and collected one decent-sized 'couta (returned) and three short-fin pike (also returned, although I know they are quite good eating in winter, when the flesh is firm: should have kept them, in retrospect).

Back into the head of the bay looking for an Aus salmon or two.  Found three, in fact, and kept them.  Then a complete surprise - spun up a nice tailor:

(Attachment Link)

Bit unusual, I thought: I know there were a few around over the summer, but this is mid-winter: water temp barely 10C.  I have reported it to Redmap.

Then knowing the solunar said there would be a hot bite for about an hour or two around midday, I sought out a flathead patch and dropped a couple of SPs  Not much happening at 11 am, but by 11.15 it had GONE OFF.  I was like a windmill, landing fish after fish after fish non-stop.  Couldn't get more than one bite at a time of my sandwich!  Fished until my arms were dropping off: released about 30 undersize, kept a dozen real good ones.  Then about 1pm it all started to go quiet again.  Was just setting out to start a drift one last time, when I heard a whistle and a plaintive cry from a boat 150 metres away:  "I can't start my motor!"

I ambled over and found a mature lady angler in consternation: Savage 4.8 metre "Osprey" with Mercury self-oiling motor and an aux - and unable to get a pop out of either.  Tried the key start: silence.  "Aha" I thought, "I've been here before".  The electronic gizmo that prevents you starting the motor when it's in gear was misbehaving.  I shoved her control into forward and back to neutral a couple of times but that didn't free it.  So, back into reverse then to neutral: turn the key - brmmm!  She decided she should head back to the ramp while the thing was operating.  Nearly kissed me in thanks, but thankfully settled for a high five and was off.

I ran one more drift after that, but the fish had gone to sleep again, so finished my coffee and called it a day.  Six different species caught, some decent fish for a feed or two (in fact, five) - and a good deed done.  All in all, a most eventful morning! (And gorgeous sunshine to boot!)
Sounds like a good day , a good feed and a good deed . Did you keep the Taylor I remember catching a few in the Prosser river years ago this time of year


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Spinksy

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fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress
« Reply #2 on: June 27, 2018, 08:09:03 pm »
great story!!! always enjoying your posts, after a day stuck in the office. Thanks for taking the time to post.
Cheers
Spinksy

reddory

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fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress
« Reply #3 on: June 28, 2018, 02:09:55 pm »

Sounds like a good day , a good feed and a good deed . Did you keep the Taylor I remember catching a few in the Prosser river years ago this time of year


I certainly did keep the tailor: they are decent eating (any pelagic fish that's built like that has pretty much got to be, I reckon).  Curious fish - I know they have turned up from time to time down the east coast, but Dover is pretty far south, and quite clearly an extension of range - particularly in the middle of winter.

rogun

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fisherman's basket and a damsel in distress
« Reply #4 on: June 28, 2018, 08:20:52 pm »
Great read Reddory,
Decent catch too,
Not every HERO wears a cape, good for you and I would place a very large bet that the lady was happy for your assistance,
Cheers and well done.  goodjob1

 

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